Maneet Dharia DDS, FIDIA

Ash Kaushesh DDS, MAGD, MaCSD, DDOCS, DABOI/ID
Implants, General, Cosmetic & IV Sedation
211 Swanson Avenue
Lake Havasu City, AZ 86403
(928) 854-8540

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Posts for: January, 2016

ChooseaMouthrinseCarefullyifyouwanttoEnhanceyourDentalHealth

Many people use a mouthrinse as part of their daily oral hygiene. If you’d also like to include a mouthrinse in your regimen, the kind you choose will depend on what you want it to do for you.

If your main desire is fresh breath, then a cosmetic rinse that imparts a minty smell to the mouth should fit the bill. That, however, is all they do — cosmetic mouthrinses don’t contribute to oral health beyond your personal satisfaction that your breath is free of bad odors. But, if you want more — added protection against dental disease, for example — then you’ll need to consider a therapeutic mouthrinse.

Therapeutic mouthrinses are usually described as anti-cariogenic (prevents decay) or anti-bacterial, and include both over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription rinses. Their purpose is to either strengthen teeth or reduce the mouth’s bacterial levels. Of the OTC variety, most contain a small amount of sodium fluoride, which can strengthen tooth enamel. They’ve proven highly effective: a number of studies show using a sodium fluoride mouthrinse in conjunction with brushing and flossing reduces the chances of new cavities forming.

A number of OTC rinses also have an anti-bacterial effect, usually provided by active ingredients such as triclosan, zinc or essential oils like menthol. Even a slight reduction in bacteria can help lessen the chances of gingivitis (gum inflammation), an early form of periodontal (gum) disease. Reducing bacteria levels may also help alleviate bad breath.

Some individuals, though, have higher than normal levels of bacteria, or a systemic weakness in fighting certain bacterial strains. If this is your case, you might benefit from a prescribed mouthrinse intended to lower bacterial levels. Most prescription mouthrinses contain chlorhexidine, which has been amply demonstrated as an effective anti-bacterial control of tooth decay and gum disease. Chlorhexidine prevents bacteria from adhering to the teeth and so disrupts plaque buildup, the main cause of dental disease. Its prolonged use will result in the dark staining of teeth in some people, but this can be removed during dental cleanings and teeth polishing. Long-term use is generally not preferred compared to getting the proper attention from regular cleanings and examinations.

If you would like more advice on adding a mouthrinse to your daily hygiene regimen, especially to help reduce your risk of dental disease, please feel free to discuss this with us at your next checkup. Regardless of which type of mouthrinse you choose, they should always be used as a complement to daily brushing and flossing, along with regular dental cleanings and checkups.

For more information on mouthrinses, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Mouthrinses.”


By Serenity Dental
January 06, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
KeepanEyeonyourGumstoCatchDiseaseEarly

You have a great smile: beautiful white teeth all perfectly aligned. But unbeknownst to you, periodontal (gum) disease might even now be damaging your gum tissues, setting the stage for future tooth and bone loss — and a ruined smile.

While it’s easy to miss the early stage of this disease caused by bacterial plaque on tooth surfaces, there are a few signs if you pay close attention. Bleeding gums after moderate brushing or flossing could indicate normally resilient gum tissues have begun to weaken. You may also notice a slight redness and swelling around the margins of the gums and a bad taste or breath. As it progresses, you may experience painful abscesses (infected pockets that develop between the gums and tooth) and loose teeth, a late sign of tissue detachment and bone loss. If you are a smoker, nicotine reduces swelling and bleeding of the gums, removing signs you have a disease. If you smoke, you need to see your dentist regularly.

While renewed daily oral hygiene is important for stopping gum disease, you may also need professional care to bring it under control. The main treatment calls for the manual removal of plaque and calculus (hardened deposits of plaque) that are sustaining the infection. Dentists and hygienists both can perform scaling, which removes plaque and calculus at or just below the gum line, and root planing to clean accessible root surfaces.

In more advanced cases, though, you may need the services of a periodontist, a specialist in treating diseased or injured gums, bone and other connective tissues that support the teeth. They’re also skilled in more advanced treatments like gum flap surgery that more fully exposes a tooth’s root area for plaque and calculus (or tartar) removal, or tissue grafting procedures that improve the health and appearance of damaged gums.

If you suspect you have gum disease, the place to start is with your family dentist. They can determine if your case will respond to basic scaling, root planing or antibiotic treatment. If the disease appears more advanced or with complications, they will most likely refer you to a periodontist for treatment.

If you’ve already seen bleeding, swelling or redness, see your dentist as soon as possible. The sooner you begin treatment for any case of gum disease, the less likely it will lead to the loss not only of your teeth but your beautiful smile.

If you would like more information on the treatment of periodontal (gum) disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “When to See a Periodontist.”