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Facts About Dental Implants: Havasu Dentist

Implants are the most popular dental restorations that offer a permanent solution for replacing missing teeth. Compared to others treatments, such as fillings, crowns, and root canals, implants last the longest. Below are FACTS about dental implants. 
  • Our implants are titanium

    • Our Serenity Dental implants are titanium, which binds to your bone through a process called “osseointegration.” Titanium is the best material for dental implants and is a permanent solution for replacing missing teeth or securing loose dentures.
  • Implants stimulate your bone

    • Stimulating your jaw bones prevents noticeable aging effects more than other products and services. Dental implants keep your bone stimulated so it does not die or decrease with missing teeth or as you age. Looks of a “sunken face,” or smaller jawline appear because of lack of bone to fill the face. You can learn more about facial aging at https://www.livescience.com/35332-face-bones-aging-110104.html.
  • Implants are delivered to you in 3 unique components:

  • Implants secure dentures

    • If you already have dentures or have treatment pending for dentures, implants placed on both the upper and lower arches of your mouth to secure them in place! Also, implant-retained dentures improve the taste delicious foods because the roof of your mouth is exposed.
  • Over 3 million people have dental implants in the US

  • Implants are the closest restoration to a natural tooth

    • Implants stimulate bone just like your natural tooth root does – implants feel like the closest match to a natural tooth.Prepping and planning is necessary with your implant procedure. Your dentist will require a medical background and a CT scan of your jawbones to ensure that implants are possible for you.

Visit https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-implants#1 for the benefits and insurance information on dental implants.

Read our blog https://www.serenityhavasu.com/oral-health/dentures-and-implants-ways-to-restore-your-smile/for more posts about dental implants!

Dentures and Implants – Ways to Restore Your Smile: Havasu Dentist

Dentures and implants are excellent solutions for restoring a confident smile. Full dentures are removable upper and lower arch appliances that fit around your jaw bones. Negative pressure from breath stabilizes your dentures. Also, patients with full dentures can also use dental glue to keep their dentures in place. Full dentures are an easy way to restore your smile.

Partial dentures restore smaller areas of the mouth that full dentures. They flawlessly replace missing teeth around your natural teeth.

Implants give you a permanent solution to restoring or replacing a missing tooth. Through their design, our titanium implants bind to your available jaw bone, just like the root of a natural tooth. Implants are placed in a specific sequence:

  1. the implant placement
  2. the healing abutment (button) placement
  3. final crown placement

One missing tooth is replaceable by one implant. If you have full dentures, 2-4 implants can be placed on your upper and lower arch to secure them in place.

Want to know more about dental implants? Read about dental implants at: https://www.aaid-implant.org/dental-implants/what-are-dental-implants/ 

Dentures and implants give you functionality back where you may be missing teeth. Visit us today to get your dental implant journey started!

Check out our blog https://www.serenityhavasu.com/dental-procedure/when-teeth-are-lost-bone-is-lost/ on bone health and function after losing teeth.

Sensitive Teeth – What Causes Tooth Sensitivity: Havasu Dentist

Tooth sensitivity can cause you to avoid hot and cold foods and beverages because of the overwhelming sensation. Sometimes, simply brushing teeth can be painful! Tooth sensitivity occurs when dentin becomes exposed in your teeth. Dentin is beneath the enamel (hard, outermost layer of your tooth). Increased exposure of dentin can cause more serious problems to your teeth, such as tooth decay!

Tooth sensitivity is the most common type of “toothache.” The pain that is experienced with sensitive teeth can be described as sharp and shooting.

Gum disease, grinding, harsh brushing, post-whitening treatment, and diet are all leading contributors to the experience of tooth sensitivity.

Sweet, acidic, and hot/cold food and drinks are major causes of tooth sensitivity if they are able to sit on the surface of your teeth for long periods of time.

Read more of our blogs on how to prevent and treat tooth sensitivity. If you’re in pain, please contact us at Serenity Dental so we can help relieve you and help you enjoy your smile.

Laser Dentistry Benefits: Havasu Dentist

What is Laser Dentistry?

Lasers in dentistry work by delivering energy in the form of light and can be used for a variety of procedures, offering several benefits to patients. Lasers can:

  • be used to remove the decay and prepare the tooth for a filling. 
  • reshape gums and remove bacteria when receiving a root canal. 
  • be used as a pain free cutting instrument for a biopsy and relieve canker sore pain. 
  • can speed up in-office teeth whitening procedures.

Receiving dental treatment with a laser rather than a dental drill may

  • reduce the need for numbing
  • reduce anxiety that a patient may have with drilling
  • reduce bleeding and swelling
  • and more!

With the different types of tissues in the mouth, there are several more applications of lasers that dentists are happy to provide.

  • In hard tissues, lasers are used as cavity detectors, providing early detection of small cavities. Lasers can also be used to seal the tubules at the root of teeth, which helps remove the feeling of having sensitive teeth.
  • In soft tissues, lasers can lengthen the look of teeth and eliminate the look of a gummy smile. Also, lasers are used for frenulas (“tongue-tied” children) and patients with speech impediments. 

Laser dentistry has shown helpful in various treatments for patients and will continue to become more popular as more dentists use laser in their work.

Please contact us today at Serenity Dental if you are interested in incorporating laser dentistry into your treatment!

 

When Teeth are Lost, Bone is Lost: Havasu Dentist

Most people think of bone as rock-solid, but it’s actually a living tissue that’s constantly changing. This has significant implications for your oral health, general health, and appearance — if you are one of the 70% of Americans missing at least one tooth.

Throughout the day, your top and bottom teeth make hundreds of fleeting contacts with each other. These small stresses are transmitted though the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around; “odont” – tooth) that supports each tooth in its socket like a hammock. Think of it as a gentle push on the hammock, which causes the tooth to gently bump the underlying bone. The bone then builds up in the spot that’s receiving stress to counteract it. This constant remodeling of bone is what allows bone to stay healthy and strong.

When a tooth is lost, the bone does not receive that gentle stress. It reacts by literally melting away. Sometimes this happens fairly quickly — in a matter of months. After the tooth-supporting bone is lost, the jawbone itself begins the same process of deterioration. This could eventually change the shape of the face, as the distance from nose to chin can decrease — even if only a few back teeth are missing. The results aren’t pretty. But the good news is, there’s a way to prevent all this.

Dental implants, which function as substitute tooth roots, actually save underlying bone when teeth are lost. They do this because they are made of titanium, which fuses to the bone in which it’s set, stabilizing it. The implant is topped by a realistic-looking crown, which replaces the part of the missing tooth that was visible in the mouth. Together, they look and function just as your natural tooth did.

If you are missing a lot of teeth, implants can also be used to anchor bridges or even removable dentures while providing that same bone-saving benefit. And when you consider that they are so durable they should never need replacement, implants are a great investment.

If you have any questions about dental implants, please contact us, or schedule an appointment for an implant consultation.

You can read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”

What Is A Dental Implant: Havasu Dentist

While the first recorded attempts at dental implant were recorded around 600 AD during the Mayan civilization, today they have become a normal and integral tool that we use to replace teeth and restore full functionality to dental and oral health. In fact, many dentists now refer to dental implants as a person’s third set of teeth, and they are the optimal choice for permanently replacing missing adult (permanent) teeth.

To help you visualize, think of your teeth as having two main parts: the crown or the part that can be seen above the gum tissues and the root, the portion that is suspended in the bone by the periodontal (gum) ligament that keeps the tooth in place. A dental implant is actually a root replacement, but unlike a tooth’s root, it is anchored in the jawbone. However, an interesting fact is that the dental implants being used today actually fuse with or integrate in to the bone to become one. This process is called “osseo-integration.”

For the most part, dental implants are made from commercial-grade, pure titanium. This metal is “osteo-philic” or literally a bone loving metal that has been used for many years by both the medical and dental professions because it is not rejected by the body. For these reasons, these dental implants are very successful and can last for a lifetime.

Implant placement is a surgical process that requires prior planning involving collaborative efforts between the implant surgeon, dentist, and a laboratory technician. Periodontists, oral surgeons, or general dentists with advanced training in implantology and surgery normally “place” them. To learn more about dental implants and the entire process, read, “Dental Implants, Your Third Set Of Teeth.” Or if you prefer, you can contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.

The Differences Between One and Two-Stage Dental Implants: Havasu Dentist

The best method for permanently replacing a missing tooth is with a dental implant. But did you know that there are two main techniques for placing implants? Implants can be placed either using a one stage or a two stage surgical technique, and as their names suggests, one is performed in one step while the other requires a second surgery.

With a one-stage procedure, a healing abutment is placed at the time of surgery. An abutment is a connector that attaches the implant from the bone into the mouth and which protrudes through the gum tissues. Following a 3 to 6 month healing period in which the implant fuses to the bone, a crown is then placed on the implant restoring the immediate appearance of a healthy, normal tooth. One-stage implant systems are generally used when the bone quality is good, guaranteeing good initial implant stability. They are also used when cosmetics is not a concern, such as the back areas of the mouth.

Under special conditions an implant can be placed and a crown placed on top of it at the same time. However, this is a very special circumstance requiring ideal conditions and surgical experience as well as crown fabrication know-how. It is generally safer and wiser not to subject an implant to biting forces until it is fully healed and integrated with the supporting bone.

two-stage procedure is typically used for replacing teeth where there is no immediate need for a cosmetic solution and when more of a margin of safety is required. With this approach, the implant(s) are placed into the jawbone and the gum tissues cover them. They are not exposed to the mouth, but stay buried and left to heal. Once healed, a second surgery is performed to attach an abutment for securing the crown in place. This approach is used when there is poorer bone quality or quantity. This may make it necessary to regenerate bone around the implant at the time of its placement. There may also be other health considerations dictating that a two-stage approach may be indicated.

Depending on your individual situation and medical status, our implant team will determine which approach is best for you. To learn more about these two procedures, read the Dear Doctor article, “Staging Surgery In Implant Dentistry.” You are also welcome to contact us to discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.

Testing your Knowledge: Dental Implants: Havasu Dentist

Dental implants are a fascinating treatment option that can be life changing when used properly. They have also experienced tremendous scientific advancements and press over the years making them highly desirable by people of all walks of life. See how much you really know about dental implants by taking our quick and easy true/false self test.

  1. Dental implants can produce lifelike results that are indistinguishable from natural surrounding teeth.
    True or False
  2. Many dental professionals consider dental implants as a “third set of teeth,” as they can last a lifetime when properly maintained.
    True or False
  3. A dental implant is a safe option that is suitable for all patients regardless of age.
    True or False
  4. When properly placed and maintained, dental implants have a 90% success rate.
    True or False
  5. If you do not have enough bone to support a successful dental implant, there is not much that can be done.
    True or False
  6. When teeth are missing, the face tends to have a sunken-in appearance called, “posterior bite collapse.”
    True or False
  7. One of the positives of dental implants is that they do not affect adjacent teeth.
    True or False
  8. Dental implants typically cost significantly more than other options, such as a bridge, over the course of a lifetime.
    True or False
  9. Dental implants are always more desirable than bridgework or other treatment options for missing teeth.
    True or False
  10. Dental implants can lead to improved health due to better nutrition and proper digestion.
    True or False

Answers:

  1. True. Dental implants can appear as beautiful, natural teeth.
  2. True. When properly maintained, implants provide the same function as natural teeth roots.
  3. False. Dental implants are not suitable for replacing primary teeth or permanent teeth in young children or teenagers. They are best used when facial and jaw development is complete.
  4. False. They have a 95% success rate.
  5. False. If you do not have enough bone for a dental implant, you may be a candidate for a bone graft — a process in which we “grow” the bone we need for the implant.
  6. True. This condition is often totally reversible once teeth have been restored through implants or bridgework.
  7. True. Unlike bridgework, dental implants do not affect surrounding teeth.
  8. False. They are less expensive in the long run.
  9. False. Sometimes a bridge is better than an implant.
  10. True. Once teeth are restored, chewing and digesting food is easier; thus health improves.

To learn more, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants, Your Third Set of Teeth.” Or, you can contact ustoday to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions.

Proper Oral Hygiene is Just as Important for Implants as it is for Natural Teeth: Havasu Dentist

One of the great benefits that patients with implants enjoy is their imperviousness to decay: unlike a natural tooth, bacteria have no effect on the materials in an implant’s construction. That doesn’t mean, however, you can become lax in your hygiene habits — although the implants may not be susceptible to disease, the surrounding gum tissue and bone are. If those tissues become infected you could start to lose the implant attachment and, as it progresses, the implant itself.

In fact, the gum tissue that surrounds the implant may be more susceptible to infection than those around natural teeth. Teeth maintain a connection with the jawbone through the periodontal ligament. Besides securing the tooth, the gum tissue has fibrous attachments to the tooth to help the gum tissue endure a lot of wear and tear and resist the invasion of bacteria and food particles. Implants are anchored directly into the jawbone (where bone eventually grows and attaches to the titanium implant surface) and don’t develop an attachment with the ligament. Implants, therefore, don’t have the benefit of resistance to bacteria and food particles that natural teeth receive through these fibrous attachments.

As a result, patients with implants need to establish a conscientious habit of effective oral hygiene. Daily removal of bacterial plaque from teeth surfaces through brushing and flossing (and semi-annual office cleanings and checkups) greatly reduce the risk of infection and subsequent inflammation. It’s also important to monitor the condition of your gums, especially around implants. If you begin to notice bleeding, red or swollen gums, or other signs of possible gum disease, you should contact us as soon as possible for an assessment.

Proper care for implants and their supporting tissues is just as necessary, and perhaps more so, than it is for natural teeth. By providing that care, you’ll help ensure years of effective service from your implants.

If you would like more information on hygiene practices with implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Infections Around Implants.”

Keeping up Good Hygiene Still a Necessity with Dental Implants: Havasu Dentist

Dental implants are widely considered the most durable tooth replacement option, thanks in part to how they attach to the jaw. But durable doesn’t mean indestructible — you must take care of them.

Implants have a unique relationship to the jawbone compared to other restorations. We imbed a slender titanium post into the bone as a substitute for a natural tooth root. Because bone has a special affinity with the metal, it grows to and adheres to the implant to create a secure anchor. This unique attachment gives implants quite an advantage over other restorations.

It isn’t superior, however, to the natural attachment of real teeth, especially in one respect: it can’t match a natural attachment’s infection-fighting ability. A connective tissue attachment made up of collagen fibers are attached to the tooth root protecting the underlying bone. An elastic gum tissue called the periodontal ligament lies between the tooth root and the bone and attaches to both with tiny collagen fibers. These attachments create a network of blood vessels that supply nutrients and infection-fighting agents to the bone and surrounding gum tissue.

Implants don’t have this connective tissue or ligament attachment or its benefits. Of course, the implants are made of inorganic material that can’t be damaged by bacterial infection. However, the gums and bone that surround them are: and because these natural tissues don’t have these same biologic barriers to infection and perhaps access to the same degree of antibodies as those around natural teeth, an infection known as peri-implantitis specific to implants can develop and progress.

It’s therefore just as important for you to continue brushing and flossing to remove bacterial plaque that causes infection to protect the gums and bone around your implants. You should also keep up regular office cleanings and checkups. In fact, we take special care with implants when cleaning them by using instruments that won’t scratch their highly polished surfaces. Such a scratch, even a microscopic one, could attract and harbor bacteria.

There’s no doubt dental implants are an excellent long-term solution for restoring your smile and mouth function. You can help extend that longevity by caring for them just as if they’re your natural teeth.

If you would like more information on caring for dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”